minute message

 Rev. E. Anderson

BEING A GOOD SERVANT

Taken from the Word for Today

William Wilberforce’s biographer, Eric Metaxas, points out that the abolition of the British slave trade had even greater implications: ‘We had suddenly entered a world in which we would never again ask whether it was our responsibility as a society to help the poor and suffering. We would only quibble about how…Once this idea was loosed upon the world, the world changed. Slavery and the slave trade would soon be largely abolished, but many lesser social evils would be abolished too. For the first time in history, groups sprang up for every possible social cause.’ That’s why Metaxas calls Wilberforce ‘The greatest social reformer in the history of the world.’ Metaxas goes on to say: ‘The world he was born into in 1759 and the world he departed in 1833 were as different as lead and gold. Wilberforce presided over a social earthquake that rearranged the continents, and whose magnitude we are only now beginning to fully appreciate.’

During his first years in Parliament, Wilberforce wined and dined each night and was touted as the ‘the wittiest man in all of England.’ Looking back on it he wrote, ‘For the first years I was in Parliament I did nothing-nothing of any purpose.’ But in committing to Christ he discovered his life’s purpose. It was not about achieving personal greatness, but about serving others. Today, go out of your way to help, bless and serve someone. If you do, when you get to the end of the day you’ll feel good about yourself. And God will feel good about you too!

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message by rick warren

Rev. Rick Warren

GOD SIZED GOALS

“Abraham said, ‘the Lord brought me from the land of my relatives to this land and he has solemnly promised me that he would give this land to my descendants’” – Genesis 24:7a NCV.

The Bible has more than 7,000 promises from God to you — promises of success, confidence, health, prosperity, strength, wisdom, and more. Why does God make these promises?

Because he wants you to learn to trust him.

When you set a goal, don’t focus on the problems; focus on the promises. Find a promise in God’s Word that will take you to your goal.

This is what Abraham does when Eliezer, his servant, starts to worry about accomplishing the goal he is given. In today’s verse, Abraham tells Eliezer about the promise he received from God: “He’ll [God] send an angel before you so that you can find a wife there for my son” (Genesis 24:7b NCV).

You don’t need an angel, because dozens of times in Scripture God has said, “I’ll be with you no matter where you go.” God is always with you, whether you feel it or not. You just need to plug into the power.

The size of your God determines the size of your goal, and godly goal-setting always starts with a promise from God. Don’t look at your limitations; look at the promises of God.

TALK ABOUT IT

How have you let your limitations limit your goals in the past?

Spend some time today in God’s Word looking for his promises, and pray about which ones you should apply to your goals.

message of note

Rev. John Lancaster

WALK IN WISDOM TOWARDS OUTSIDERS

“There was a massive poster of me down my road, right outside the chip shop. I was about to go in, but then I saw it and changed my mind. Me coming out with a bag of chips, while I’m up there doing crunches on the poster… well, it wouldn’t look good,” said Jessica Ennis, who is one of the bright hopes for gold in the London Olympics this month.

Jessica was speaking about how the challenge of athletic success had demanded adjustments to her personal life. She had to watch how she lived, not only for personal reasons, but also for the image she presented to the watching world.

Exactly the same advice comes from the award-winning spiritual athlete, Paul: “Walk in wisdom toward outsiders, making the best use of the time. Let your speech always be gracious, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how you ought to answer each person” (Colossians 4:5-6),

In Ephesians 5:15, he urges us to ‘walk circumspectly’, which is a walk described by one old preacher as the way a cat gingerly negotiates the glass-embedded top of a wall.

In the same way, Peter writes, “In your hearts honour Jesus Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defence to anyone who asks you for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect, having a good conscience, so that, when you are slandered, those who revile your good name in Christ may be put to shame” (I Peter 3:15-16).

‘Would our Christian employee please step forward as I’m unable to identify you from your conduct”.

‘The man whose personal conduct in the world of work contradicts his profession of faith is a disaster’.

Even slaves, living at the low­est level of existence in Roman society, are reminded that they can ‘adorn the doctrine’ – make the message of the gospel attrac­tive – by their personal attitude and conduct at work, a challenge which is extended to every Chris­tian who awaits Christ’s coming again.

The necessity of lifestyle confirming the profession of faith came home painfully to me as a teenage Christian in the RAF. Virtually bullied by an older air­man into participating in the unit’s weekly football pool – he called me mean-fisted, unsporting, goody-goody and a host of other things – reluctantly I gave in and gave him a sixpenny piece.

He let the coin rest in the palm of his hand, looked at me derisively and said, “Huh, I thought you were supposed to be a Christian!” Suddenly, that little silver coin looked to me like Judas’s blood money, and a sense of shame overwhelmed me. It was a small thing, but it taught me never to compromise, because the world actually does expect Christians to be different.

As the anti-Christian philosopher Nietzsche said, “You will have to look more redeemed if I am to believe in your Redeemer.”

It is significant that both Paul and Peter insist that Christians must give verbal testimony to their faith – it is not enough to just live a good life. There must be the sharing of the truth of the gospel – but both say witnessing without the corroboration of a godly life is not enough.

The man whose personal conduct in the world of work contradicts his profession of faith is a disaster; the woman whose attitude in her office raises questioning eyebrows is equally so, and the Christian who is as materialistic, selfish, intolerant, unreliable, and as worldly ambitious as his unsaved neighbours will confirm the world’s doubt about the truth of the gospel.

Going for gold in the Christian sense is not merely a matter of achieving success through brief sprints of hectic activity now and then. It means the steady rhythms of the marathon in which character is formed and Christ is exalted through the purity, integrity, and shining quality of a Spirit-anointed life.

meet the ministers

Rev. John and Cathy Benyon

ABOUT THE FOUNDERS

John and Cathy Beynon have been married for 22 years. They have 4 children, Josiah (19), Jacob (17), Jemima (7) and Reuben (5)

I have been in full-time Christian ministry for over 25 years after completing a theology degree at Cambridge University. During that time, I have had the privilege of working in a variety of different ministries and geographical locations. I started my ministry working as an evangelist, working with students and young people, and also helping various Anglican and Methodist churches to reach out effectively.

In 1988 I co-founded the Beverley Community Church, which I led for several years. In 1992, Cathy and myself and I pioneered a ministry on the Longhill estate, an urban-priority housing estate in East Hull. We have always had a heart to reach those places and people untouched by the gospel, especially the poor and those in need. Cathy continued to lead this ministry for 12 years.

Around 1995, the main focus of my ministry was with a missionary organisation called World Horizons. I became the leader of their work in the UK and later became a part of the Global leadership team. During this time I learned a lot about leadership and the practicalities of running large organisations. From 95 – 2000 I was also involved in leading a Bible & MissionTraining school for the Pentecostal Movement of Iceland. The school ran for 3 months each year, so I had to spend a lot of time away from home, and got very used to a lifestyle of  travelling

In the year 2000, my ministry took a significant change of direction after receiving a clear call to a ministry of prayer. I co-founded a national prayer ministry in France called Object France, which was involved in mobilising hundreds of French churches in 40 days of prayer and fasting each year from 2001 up until the present time. Since 2002 I have also been involved in mobilising Churches to pray in Norway, first on a national level and then more specifically in Oslo, working with Churches from many different denominations and cultural backgrounds across the city.

 I was really excited when the Lord called us to start a new Church in Beverley. I have lived in Beverley since 1976, even though the main focus of my ministry has been overseas for the last 14 years. I really love this town, and am excited about being involved in local ministry again. I am looking forward to see what God is going to do here.

INFLUENCES

As a young Christian I was deeply influenced by Operation Mobilisation and their call to mission and a radical life-style. More recently, I have been strongly influenced by the Toronto Airport Christian Fellowship, where the revival fires are still burning just as strongly as when the “Toronto Blessing” first broke out in 1994. Over the past
few years, I have had the privilege of getting to know John and Carol Arnott personally, and have been involved in conferences in Norway and Iceland with them and several others from their team. However, the most significant influence on my life in recent years has been the International House of Prayer, led by Mike Bickle, in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. They have been praying and worshiping the Lord 24 hours a day since 1999! They have almost 1000 full-time staff now, whose main ministry is to pray and worship the Lord! I love their dedication in seeking the Lord’s face and their commitment to a life-style of prayer and fasting.

Cathy writes:

My life is full and varied, and no day is ever the same. I have four children aged 5 – 19 years. Young children and teens make an interesting mix of music and mayhem to fill every moment!

Since my early teens, my faith has always been central to my life. Becoming a Christian at a Billy Graham rally in 1985 was the beginning of a journey with God that has been and is still very exciting.

In my early teens, I attended Sunday School at BaintonMethodistChurch. My four brothers and sisters also joined with me and an extra Sunday School teacher was brought in to help from a nearby village! A local Methodist Lay Preacher taught me how to take services and lead worship from the tender age of 14 years.

As a young Christian I was deeply influenced by Operation Mobilisation and their call to mission and a radical life-style. More recently, I have been strongly influenced by the Toronto Airport Christian Fellowship, where the revival fires are still burning just as strongly as when the “Toronto Blessing” first broke out in 1994. Over the past
few years, I have had the privilege of getting to know John and Carol Arnott personally, and have been involved in conferences in Norway and Iceland with them and several others from their team. However, the most significant influence on my life in recent years has been the International House of Prayer, led by Mike Bickle, in Kansas City, Missouri, USA. They have been praying and worshiping the Lord 24 hours a day since 1999! They have almost 1000 full-time staff now, whose main ministry is to pray and worship the Lord! I love their dedication in seeking the Lord’s face and their commitment to a life-style of prayer and fasting. 

 

 
 

 

 

living devotions

Rev. E. Anderson

CREATING A GOOD ATMOSPHERE

Living Senior Ministries

“Therefore, if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother or sister has something against you, leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to them; then come and offer your gift” –Matthew 5:23-24

Mstislav “Slava” Rostropovich is a world-famous cellist. Since his exile from his native Russia in 1974, he has lived in the West. When Communist hard-liners pulled a coup several years ago, Slava was in Paris. But instead of scurrying back to the U.S. and safety, he and his family flew straight home to Moscow.

There, he took up his place in the Russian FederationBuilding that President Boris Yeltsin and his elected allies vowed to hold against every assault. In the darkened corridors, someone gave him an automatic rifle, but he returned it. Rather, he took out his cello and gave an impromptu recital to break the awful tension of the siege.

It’s amazing how something beautiful can quell a division. You’ve probably heard of the stories from the World War I battlefronts where opposing sides ceased fighting for Christmas day, and even sang carols together. It was the focus on something greater that unified them and pushed their division to the side.

There’s nothing more beautiful than Jesus. And because of that, we as believers should never let conflict with other Christians hinder us from our worship of Him. Choose Christ over conflict, and let unity under Him overwhelm all division.

PRAYER CHALLENGE

Ask God to help you and others pursue Christ so that any division would be dissolved as you focus on Him.

leaderhip factors

Rev. Philip Pye

PILGRIMMAGE

Psalm 84:5 ‘Blessed are those whose strength is in you, whose hearts are set on pilgrimage’

I write this devotional in the very week that, 390 years ago in 1620, just over 100 Pilgrim Fathers set sail from Plymouth heading to the New World, later to become the United States of America.

Pilgrimage is defined as ‘A journey – especially a long one – and a journey of purpose’. The literal travels of the brave and intrepid Pilgrim Fathers are inspirational to all who desire to be pilgrim leaders. What is required for such a life and ministry journey?

A VISION TO FUEL IT: ‘A leader is one who sees more than others, who sees further than others see and who sees before others do,’ Leroy Eims.

A value to undergird it: ‘Our values will affect our priorities, outlook and decisions on the immediate in the light of the ultimate.’

A VALOUR TO SUSTAIN IT – The Pilgrim Fathers did not undertake their trip primarily motivated by financial gain but: ‘For the glory of God and the advancement of the faith’. It was not without cost. For all leaders on occasions the waves seem mountainous, the waters perilous, the obstacles dangerous. The pilgrim leader is going to need guts!

Their legacy was immense, with the freedoms they believed in later enshrined in the constitution of the emerging nation of America. Here we are nearly 400 years later still impacted by believers committed to a journey.

Fellow leader don’t draw back or be sidetracked – continue to the goal to which Christ has called you, and be inspired afresh by the words of an ancient hymn (yep, ancient language too) to be a pilgrim!

He who would valiant be, gainst all disaster

Let him in constancy follow the Master

There’s no discouragement shall make him once relent

His first avowed intent, to be a pilgrim

 

 

just a thought

Rev. Aaron Linford

OVERFLOW

Jesus spoke of eternal life as a fountain springing up within the heart of the believer (John 4:14), giving satisfaction for soul-thirst. He later spoke about “rivers of living water” flowing out of that same inner self in service to others (John 7:32,33).

The difference is that the “well” can be self-contained but the river is an overflow. Regeneration is a wonderfully thirst quenching event, but the Renewing of the Holy Spirit (Titus 3:5,6), begins an outflow that is inexhaustible -“rivers” flowing with refreshing energy from US to OTHERS.

But what an amazing thing Jesus stated. What starts as a “drink” becomes “rivers” – many channels …. outreach a saving mission. In Ezekiel 47 healing waters issue from the throne of God, widening and deepening as they flow. But there are not tributaries, the supply all-sufficient. As we advance in his ways the water of the Spirit deepens we are swept off our feet – “Waters to swim in.”

 

 

illustrations that light up life

Rev. E. Anderson

INTIMIDATION OF THE GREAT

Christian Herter was running hard for re-election as governor of Massachusetts, and one day he arrived late at a barbecue. He’d had no breakfast or lunch, and he was famished. As he moved down the serving line, he held out his plate and received one piece of chicken. The governor said to the serving lady, “Excuse me, do you mind if f get another piece of chicken. I’m very hungry.” The woman replied, “Sorry, I’m supposed to give one piece to each person.” He repeated, “But I’m starved,” and again she said: “Only one to a customer.” Herter was normally a modest man, but he decided this was the rime to use the weight of his office and said, “Madam, do you know who I am? I am the governor of this state.” She answered, “Do you know who I am? I’m the lady in charge of chicken. Move along, mister.” This is a woman who knew her position and wasn’t about to be intimidated. Do we as Christians recognize the significant position in which we stand because of Christ.”

 

healing testimonies

 

Mrs. Gilchrist

PARALYTIC SEIZURE HEALED AT AYR 

At Principal George Jeffreys’ Revival Campaign 

About two years ago I gave my heart to Jesus and have since trusted Him as my own personal, loving Saviour. I cannot tell you how He has guided, how He has loved, and how in so many different ways He has blessed me. Truly I have personal experience of Jesus as an unfailing Friend. After suf­fering- with a paralytic seizure for some time and attending without success one of the best infirmaries, I was asked by a friend to visit AyrTown Hall, where ser­vices were being con­ducted by Principal Jeffreys. 

I told a well-known Glasgow pastor that I proposed attending the Principal’s Divine heal­ing service. ” Oh,” he said, ” take my advice and don’t go near AyrTown Hall. You will only come back worse.” However, I was not going to be discouraged. Instead I just kept be­fore me those words, 

Be of good courage,  and He strength Unto your heart shall send, A11  ye  whose  hope   and  confidence Doth on  the Lord  depend. 

I attended the three o’clock service in Ayr after travelling two hours from Glasgow. 

At the close of the meeting I was prayed for by Principal Jeffreys and instantaneously healed of my affliction. I have never had a quiver since. All praise to God for sending Principal Jeffreys with the Foursquare Gospel to AyrTown Hall.

great stories

Rev. E. Anderson

SAVING A MARRIAGE

by Arthur Gordon

Is it ever possible to pick up the pieces?

We once had some friends whose marriage was drifting towards the rocks. We knew this because each partner expressed increasing dissatisfaction with the other – complaints that often seemed justified.

Then suddenly the bickering and faultfinding ceased. The marriage took on new warmth and vitality. The change was so astonishing that one day I asked the husband what had happened to them.

‘Eight words happened to us,’ he said. ‘Or, to be more accurate, four.’ He told me how one day he and his wife found themselves confessing their mutual dissatisfaction to an old physician who had known them both since childhood. The doctor silently listened to all their recriminations. Finally, he said, ‘I can give you a prescription that may help. It’s an old saying that goes like this: We like someone because, we love someone although. Think about it carefully. If you can grasp that distinction and make up your minds to apply those last four words to your problems, I think your marriage can be saved.’

It wasn’t easy, the husband told me, but they did it. First they prayed about their effort and asked for God’s help. Then they stopped expecting or demanding perfection from each other. Each partner decided — it was an act of will, really — to go on loving although. And gradually the broken pieces of the marriage came together again.

Might there not be a challenge here for any marriage or any family? Suppose, choosing a quiet moment, one person went to another and said, ‘I really love you. I love you although sometimes you do this one particular thing that upsets me.’

Wouldn’t a lot of smouldering grievances be exposed and resolved? Wouldn’t family or marriage ties grow closer? It might take some courage, but if people occasionally told one another that they liked them because and loved them although, wouldn’t that be a healing and strengthening thing?

I think so.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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